St Louis Police Veteran's Association 
 City of St Louis Metropolitan Police Department 
 City of Saint Louis Missouri 

Photo
of
City of Saint Louis Police Department Communications Building
City of Saint Louis Missouri
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's Communications Building !
The City of Saint Louis Metropolitan Police Communications Building dedicated 1989 located in 1200 block Spruce
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's Communications Patch !
Photo
of
City of Saint Louis Police Department
1939 Radio Division Sixth Floor Police Headquarters
City of Saint Louis Missouri
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1939 Radio Division Sixth Floor !
Photo 1939 ( the calendar on the wall is July 1939 )
Radio Division Sixth Floor Police Headquarters Room 610 and 612
ON THE AIR
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1939 Radio Division Sixth Floor !
Photo 1939
SILENCE
Look at the typewriters, no spell checkers, just the Captain with his red pen .
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1939 Radio Division Sixth Floor !
Photo 1939
Police Telephone Operators answering incoming calls .
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1939 Radio Division Sixth Floor !
Photo 1939
Police Radio Division Equipment .
There was only one broadcast channel with the letters KGPC which in police slang meant "Keep Going - Police Coming".
Latter, the letters were changed to KAB246 and then KAB246 and KRF578
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1939 Radio Division Sixth Floor !
Photo 1939
Police X-Ray Equipment
January 1951
The City of Saint Louis Police Department installed their first tow-way radios in
police cars and certain solo and tri-car motorcycles .

Photo of Saint Louis Police Officer Chester Voelpel modeling a two way radio !
City of Saint Louis Police Officer demonstrating a two-way radio for advertising the two way radio .

1961
The City of Saint Louis Police Department purchased and instituted portable two-way police radios .
Photo
of
City of Saint Louis Police Department
January 10, 1972 Communications Third Floor Headquarters
City of Saint Louis Missouri
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1972 Communications Third Floor !
In January 1972 a new one million dollar radio system for the Communications Center was introduced .
The Police Districts was divided into six radio zones for dispatching with information inquiry functions .
Another three radio zones were assigned to units such as command, investigation, and traffic .
Police Officer Clyde Fulgham is at the supervisors desk in the foreground on left side .
In the background sitting on the left side is Bill Winterbauer .

Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1972 Communications Third Floor !
Photo
of
City of Saint Louis Police Department
1972 Complaint Evaluation Third Floor Headquarters
City of Saint Louis Missouri
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's 1972 Complaint Evaluations Third Floor !
Complaint Evaluation Unit in 1972
In April 1865 the police telegraph system was introduced .
In March 1878 the first telephone was installed in headquarters .
In 1881 the first police telephone system was installed connecting all districts .
This allowed officers in the districts to connect to each other and to headquarters .
In October 1881 the telephone replaced the telegraph .
In the 1950's and 60's the phone number was CE1-1212 .
In 1976 the telephone system Centrex was started .
REJIS
Regional Justice Information System! Regional Justice Information System Regional Justice Information System!
1964 the IBM 7040 computer was installed on the third floor of Headquarters .
1965 Saint Louis Police Officers in the field in vehicles received information in the field from the computer .
1966 the online arrest and wanted system and booking system was perfected giving instant information .
August 21, 1967 the department began acess to the National Crime Information Center ( NCIC ) .
1968 a new IBM 360/30 computer system was installed replacing the IBM 7040 .
1969 all districts began operating under the resource allocation program using a federal grant .
1970 behicle registration inquiries went directly to MULES instead of by teletype .
1971 a new IBM 360/50 computer system was installed replacing the IBM 360/30 using a federal grant .
1972 a new IBM 370/155 computer system was installed replacing the IBM 360/50 .
With the 370/155 the old district teletype machines was replaced and removed from the department offices .
1973 wanted and missing persons files became fully active .
The Saint Louis Police Department joined REJIS July 1974 .
Photo
of
Police Call Box
City of Saint Louis Metropolitan Police Department
Saint Louis Missouri
Photo of Saint Louis Police Call Box Saint Louis Police Department !
The City of Saint Louis Metropolitan Police Department's Call Box .
The first City of Saint Louis Police Call Boxes was installed in 1881 .

The deadliest incident in St. Louis Police history was not a shootout, natural disaster or act of terrorism.
The deadliest incident in St. Louis Police history occurred on the night of Monday, September 3, 1900.
The assailant was electricity, when a power line with 3300 volts of electricity fell onto the telephone lines,
at Eight Street and Car Avenue that connected all the policemen’s call boxes.
70 policeman patrolling the Downtown District were potentially victims as they made their way to the call boxes for their 7:00 p.m. check-ins.
By the end of the night, two policeman lay dead and thirteen others were seriously burned
or suffered injuries from being thrown from the call boxes or the call center at headquarters.
Before the implementation of the two-way radio, policeman had to call in on the call box every hour,
so the station would know that they were okay. The call box was also the primary way to call for a transport after someone had been arrested.
As the policemen began to make their way to the call boxes, a radio operator was knocked back against the wall in the station due to the shock.
The command personnel sent out messengers to warn the officers about the potential threat but many did not get the warning in time.
A lineman, who responded to police headquarters, was also badly shocked.
Most of the thirteen officers, who were injured, suffered burns to their hands or were knocked unconscious.
A couple suffered joint injuries from being thrown from the call boxes.
The most common burn injuries were to the hands from inserting keys into the call box or cranking the call box handle.
Patrolman John F. Killoren inserted his key into the call box at Fifteenth Street and Franklin Avenue and was blown back into the street.
Killoren staggered to his feet and tried to open the call box again before bystanders could stop him.
He was knocked back into the street with serious burns to his hands.
In addition to the injured officers, many of whom were transported to area hospitals by citizens, who rendered them aid, two officers would lose their life.
The current killed young officer, Nicholas F. Beckmann, and veteran officer, John P. Looney.
Beckmann was a twenty-six year old veteran of the Spanish-American War, who fought at the battle of San Juan Hill.
Beckman used the call box on Eighteenth Street between Washington and Carr Avenue.
As Beckmann opened the call box, he screamed and fell backward.
Bystanders took him to the nearby Protestant Hospital, where he never regained consciousness.
The department had to break the news to his widowed mother, who lived with Beckmann.
James Looney was a 41-year-old husband and father, who had been on the force since 1893.
Looney was shocked trying to open the call box at Twelfth Street and Morgan Avenue.
He was taken to the dispensary but never regained consciousness and died 15 minutes after the initial shock.
City Lighting officials determined the culprit to be the power line from the Seckner Contracting Company.
According to city officials, the Seckner companies lines were supposed to be below ground but the company received a waiver
from the Board of Public Improvements, which is why the lines were above ground.
The officials cut down the responsible lines and set about requiring Seckner to bury the lines.
In 2006, the St. Louis Police Department recognized that Michael P. Burke, who was one of the eleven men shocked that night,
died of those injuries 15 months later on December 13, 1901,
making it only the second time in Police Department history that three St. Louis officers would lose their life in the same incident.
The department shootouts get much more coverage but the deadliest night in St. Louis Police history was September 3, 1900,
when electricity attacked an unsuspecting force.
by Ken Zimmerman Jr.


Police call boxes were located at numerous locations prior to the nineteen seventies .
The typical police box contained a telephone linked directly to the local police station allowing officers
on the beat to keep in contact with the station, reporting anything unusual, requesting help if necessary or
even to detain prisoners until a vehicle could be sent to transport them to the station or to jail .
This was in the day when most police officers walked a beat rather than using a police car and there were no walkie talkie radios .
One of the great rarities anymore is the call box key that was issued to every young Police Officer Recruit .
Police boxes were phased out in the 1970s following the introduction of personal police radios .
Monday, September 3, 1900
City of Saint Louis Police Officers
Monday, September 3, 1900!  Officer Down Memorial Page Remembers those electrocuted while attempting to use call boxes on their beats Monday, September 3, 1900!
Photo of Saint Louis Police Department's Call Box in 1962 with Police Officer Jack Fulluo !
The interior of Saint Louis Police Call Box with red light on top in 1962 .
The red light on top of the call box was activated when a call was pending .
You could find anything stored in a call box when the door was opened .
To call the desk you dialed 20, the captain dial 22, the detective bureau dial 24,
the report room dial 25 or 26, the juvenile office idal 24 or 28, and
to dail another district 9 + 5 + one of the numbers above .
FLAIR
by
Boeing
An Automatic Vehicle Monitoring system providing real-time location and status information for each vehicle in the system .
The system was implemented city-wide by the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department circa 1979 .
The potentials were to be improved effectiveness of the force, greater productivity, and a cost-effective system .
The system would include a display showing a map of the city with police cars,
including their identification number, properly positioned on the map for the police dispatcher .
The principal goal was reduction in response time .
Other objectives were to include improved officer safety, more effective command and control,
less voice band congestion because of the digital communications, and better supervision of the force .
The evaluation results were unfavorable for response time reduction,
favorable for improved operations due to digital communication, and mixed in the realization of other objectives .
Poor system performance had some influence on the evaluation results .
During the process of evaluation, it became clear that full system potential could not be assessed without some change
in police procedures and operating methods .
Such potential which is yet to be verified relates to the use of directed dispatch rather than the all points broadcast for extraordinary events .
The reallocation of the force was supposed to maintain a patrol presence in areas where excessive calls for service depleted the force availability .
Better supervision of the force was made possible by the new information that the Automatic Vehicle Monitoring that the system supplied .
However, the program was abandoned for some unknown reason .
Thus this was failed experiment, with monies from a United States Government Law Enforcement Grant .

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